Wildlife in Common

NWT New Buckenham Common, photo by Barry Madden 1/3
NWT East Winch Common, photo by Richard Osbourne 2/3
NWT Syderstone Common, photo by Richard Osbourne 3/3
We are working in partnership with Norfolk County Council and University of East Anglia on an exciting two-year project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund thanks to money raised by National Lottery players, with additional support from Essex & Suffolk Water Branch Out Fund. The aim is to:
  • Equip community volunteers with new skills to carry out the first comprehensive survey of wildlife and historic features on 60 Norfolk Commons.
  • Celebrate and increase awareness of the unique history of common land, creating pride in local green spaces.
  • Inspire, train and support local communities to take practical action to protect and conserve commons and benefit wildlife and people.

Would you like to help us record wildlife on a common?

Throughout the year, we will work with volunteer surveyors to collect wildlife records on commons. Volunteers will be offered training and support through the project and will no doubt discover a wealth of wildlife on Norfolk commons, from widespread species such as meadow buttercup and blackbirds, to specialised species from butterflies to bees.

If you would like more information on helping with recording wildlife on commons please email wild@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk and tell us:
  • Your name
  • Where you live (this will help us match you to a common)
  • If you are interested in recording anything in particular

Would you like to help research the history of a common?

A major element of this project will be to support communities in researching the history of their common. This will involve collaboration with the University of Anglia and the Norfolk Record Office at Norfolk County Council. Hopefully this will help us understand more about the role of commons in the past and the pivotal role they have played over many centuries. The history of individual commons is often unrecorded, although they can contain archaeological features from burial mounds to wartime pill boxes.

If you would like more information on helping us to research the history of commons please email wild@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk and tell us:
  • Your name
  • Where you live (this will help us match you to a common)
Wildlife in Common events
Discover your local common on a free walk, talk or event
Commons in Norfolk
Explore the many commons in Norfolk we will be surveying
Add your sighting to the map
Help us record 20 key species linked to commons in Norfolk

Watch this space

As the project progresses we will be adding more and more to this page including:
  • Self-guided walks to help you explore
  • Practical task days to help us improve commons for wildlife