Send us your wildlife sightings

Recording wildlife is an easy way to get involved in wildlife conservation. It is a way of helping us to monitor wildlife across the county to gain an understanding of an animal’s distribution. Your sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife and identify species in decline or under threat.

Each season we ask you to help Norfolk's wildlife by sending us your sightings of three iconic species. You don't have to be an expert – all you need to do is tell us when and where you spot them. Use the form to record online, or phone or email us using the details below.

Our current total of wildlife records submitted for this survey are


155
Brambling

960
Fieldfare

382
Redwing

Log your wildlife sightings here...

Sighting locations so far...


Key

Brambling
Fieldfare
Redwing
Winter in Norfolk is a magical time. This season is a time of seeing wonderful and diverse winter visitors. Norfolk is awash with birds that have migrated from their summer breeding grounds to spend the winter with us. It is a season alive with flocks of birds such as pink-footed geese feeding, starling murmurations forming magical shapes in the sky to the gathering of large groups of raptors, coming together to roost. This winter we would love you to share your winter visitor bird sightings with us, in particular we would like you to share your records of fieldfare, redwing and brambling. Whether you are lucky enough to have them visit your garden, or you see them on your local patch, you can help us map sightings within our county so we can build a picture of where they are found.

How to spot a fieldfare: Fieldfares are similar to mistle thrushes in shape, size and their behaviour. The fieldfare has a chestnut-brown back and yellowy breast, streaked with black. It has a black tail, dark wings and pale grey rump and head.

How to spot a redwing: The redwing is dark brown above and white below, with a black-streaked breast and distinctive orangey-red flanks and underwing, which the similar songthrush lacks. It has a very smart face pattern, with a white eyebrow stripe and dark brown cheeks.

How to spot a brambling: Bramblings are sometimes mistaken with chaffinches, but bramblings are slightly bigger and have a distinguishable white rump in flight. During winter the male brambling have a mottled grey-brown head (this turns black in the summer), a bright orange and white breast. Their wings are black, white and orange. The females have similar colouring but are not so vibrant in colour.
Fieldfare
Fieldfares are large stocky thrushes with a similar shape to blackbirds and the same size as a mi...
Redwing
The redwing is a small thrush that visits Norfolk in the winter to feast on berry-laden bushes in...
Brambling
Bramblings are seen along the coast as they migrate into the UK to and from their winter grounds ...
Recording wildlife is an easy way to get involved in wildlife conservation. It is a way of helping us to monitor wildlife across the county to gain an understanding of an animal’s and plant’s distribution. Your sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife and identify species in decline or under threat.

 

Fieldfare

The fieldfare is a large, colourful thrush that visits Norfolk from October through to March. During this time it can be seen feasting on berry-laden bushes in hedgerows, woodlands and parks. Fieldfares are sociable birds and can be seen in flocks of more than 200 birds roaming through the countryside. They often venture into gardens when there is snow cover or if it is a severe winter.

The fieldfare occurs throughout the British Isles in winter. It starts arriving in early October with first sightings occurring on the east coast; then they work their way through the country during the winter months. There is a very small breeding population of no more than 15 pairs in the UK, but this bird is very much at its southern breeding range. The UK breeding birds are confined to the far north in the Scottish Highlands. Due to the limited numbers of breeding pairs in the UK the fieldfare is classified here as Red under the Birds of Conservation Concern 4: the Red List for Birds (2015) and it is protected in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, 1981.

 

Redwing

The redwing is a small thrush that visits Norfolk in the winter to feast on berry-laden bushes in hedgerows, orchards, parks and gardens. Redwings migrate here at night - on clear evenings listen out for their 'tsee' call overhead. They can often be spotted in flocks with fieldfares, moving from bush to bush looking for food. Apples and berry-producing bushes like hawthorn may attract redwings into your garden.

Classified in the UK as Red under the Birds of Conservation Concern 4: the Red List for Birds (2015). Protected in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, 1981. Listed as Near Threatened on the global IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
 

Brambling

The brambling is a winter migrant to Norfolk and typically arrives in September, returning to Scandinavia and Russian by April. This woodland species likes to feed on seeds and nuts, with beech masts being a particular favourite. They may be seen visiting garden feeders, especially if there is a shortage of food. Numbers to the UK may vary greatly and are very much dependent on the availability of food.

This bird is a Schedule 1 listed bird, protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

Fieldfare

  • According to the British Trust for Ornithology up to 1 million fieldfares cross the North Sea each October.
  • The Spanish call fieldfares the royal thrush because of their upright stature and beautiful plumage.
  • Fieldfares will nest in small colonies, giving them greater protection against predators and therefore a higher breeding success
  • Fieldfares will aggressively defend the nest, often pelting intruders with droppings.
  • Approximately 1 million fieldfares over winter in the UK.

Redwing

  • Around 1 million redwings visit the UK in the winter, but only a handful of birds actually breed in the UK in the Scottish Highlands.
  • Redwings migrate at night, moving generally when the sky is clear and the wind is in the east.
  • Whilst migrating redwings keep in touch with one another through a high pitched call.
  • Redwings breed in the northern taiga forests, typically building their nests on the ground.
  • Redwings detect fruit using ultraviolet vision.

Brambling

  • During the winter months there brambling numbers range between 45,000 to 1,800,000 individuals.
  • Male bramblings tend to winter further north than the females.
  • Bramblings make their nest from moss, lichen, heather and cobwebs.
  • The name brambling is thought to derive from a German word linked to a bramble or thorny bush.
  • During the winter bramblings prefer to feed on the ground in large flocks, but during the summer they feed up high in the woodland canopy.

Download the reports on our previous surveys

   Brown-hare,-barn-owl-and-common-frog-survey-April,-May-and-June-2015 Download   
   Hedgehog,-House-Martin-and-Red-Admiral-Survey-August-2015 Download   
   Water-vole,-grass-snake-and-Himalayan-balsam-survey-July-2015 Download   
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Have you seen any other wildlife recently? We would love to hear about it... Notify us now

How to take part in this wildlife survey...

Online


The quickest way to take part is by clicking on the submit button below. You will then be asked: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By phone


Phone Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s Wildlife Information Service on 01603 598333. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By e-mail


Send us an email to wild@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

Take part today...