Send us your wildlife sightings

Recording wildlife is an easy way to get involved in wildlife conservation. It is a way of helping us to monitor wildlife across the county to gain an understanding of an animal’s distribution. Your sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife and identify species in decline or under threat.

Each season we ask you to help Norfolk's wildlife by sending us your sightings of three iconic species. You don't have to be an expert – all you need to do is tell us when and where you spot them. Use the form to record online, or phone or email us using the details below.

Our current total of wildlife records submitted for this survey are


177
Hedgehog

41
Peacock butterfly

159
House Martin

Log your wildlife sightings here...

Sighting locations so far...


Key

Hedgehog
House Martin Nest
Peacock butterfly
Your garden can play an important role in the conservation of Norfolk’s wildlife, and can be host to many different species, from grass snakes to goldfinches, daisies to damselflies. A garden managed with wildlife in mind can be a place that provides food, shelter and protection for wildlife in your local area. A garden border full of nectar-rich flowers can be a vital source of food for bees and butterflies, a compost heap a home to a hedgehog, the side of your house the perfect location for a house martin nest.

This June, July and August we are asking people to get in touch about the wildlife visiting their gardens in Norfolk. In particular we are looking for records of hedgehogs, house martin nests and peacock butterflies.

Recording wildlife is an easy way to get involved in wildlife conservation. It is a way of helping us to monitor wildlife across the county to gain an understanding of an animal’s distribution. Your sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife and identify species in decline or under threat.
Hedgehog
This common and familiar mammal is easily recognisable with its many spines, long dark snout, ...
Peacock butterfly
Peacocks are large butterflies with a wingspan of 63-75 mm with the males larger than the females...
House Martin
The house martin is a bird very much associated with village life, living close to humans making ...
Why send us your hedgehog sightings?
According to a project run by the British Hedgehog Preservation Society three recent surveys all indicate downward trends in hedgehog populations: “We appear to have lost around 30% of the population since 2002 and therefore it seems likely that there are now fewer than a million hedgehogs left in the UK.”  If you have a hedgehog in your garden please do let us know. You do not have to see it to know it is visiting your garden: if you see hedgehog droppings or footprints you can still submit your record.


Why do we want your house martin nest sightings?
Look up high and see if you can find a house martin nest on the side of your house or on any buildings where you live. House martins are rapidly declining, but it is not clear why, so knowing their distribution in Norfolk is important to aid their conservation.


Why do we want your peacock butterfly sightings?

Peacock butterflies are frequent visitors to gardens, often seen feeding on buddleia, ivy blossom and bramble. With red wings and distinctive eyespots, this butterfly is an easy garden visitor to spot. Butterflies are valuable indicators of the health of the environment; submit your peacock butterfly sightings and put them on the map.

Hedgehog

•    Hedgehogs were also called hedge pigs.

•    In the 1980s hedgehog flavoured crisps were made, but luckily they didn’t contain any hedgehog!

•    An adult hedgehog has 5,000 to 7,000 spines.

•    A baby hedgehog is called a hoglet.

•    There may be up to 500 fleas on one hedgehog but the specific hedgehog flea (known as Archaepsylla erinacei) rarely bites humans.


Peacock butterfly

  • Peacock butterflies overwinter as an adult. This means you may see them flying on warm winter days.
  • The ‘eyes’ on their wings give them their common name but the underside of a peacock butterfly’s wings looks like a dead leaf.
  • The peacock lays its eggs on stinging nettles and these are the food plant of the caterpillars when they hatch out.
  • The newly hatched caterpillars spin a communal web and they stay in this to feed until they are big enough to forage on their own.
  • The peacock butterfly is a strong flyer and ranges widely to find its preferred habitat of in the shelter of woodland edges, clearings and rides.

House Martin nest

  • It takes house martins approximately 10 days to construct their mud-cupped nest.
  • It takes approximately 1,000 beaked size mud pellets to make each nest.
  • Roughly 86% of swallows in Britain attempt to rear two broods.
  • It takes roughly 3 weeks for the house martin nest to be built.
  • House martins prefer to re-use old nests to building a new one – re-use, reduce, recycle!
  • A bit of a squeeze, but one nest was once recorded as holding 11 house martins.

Download the reports on our previous surveys

   Brown-hare,-barn-owl-and-common-frog-survey-April,-May-and-June-2015 Download   
   Hedgehog,-House-Martin-and-Red-Admiral-Survey-August-2015 Download   
   Water-vole,-grass-snake-and-Himalayan-balsam-survey-July-2015 Download   
Show more +
Have you seen any other wildlife recently? We would love to hear about it... Notify us now

How to take part in this wildlife survey...

Online


The quickest way to take part is by clicking on the submit button below. You will then be asked: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By phone


Phone Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s Wildlife Information Service on 01603 598333. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By e-mail


Send us an email to wild@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

Take part today...