Hornbeam, Lower Wood, Ashwellthorpe, Tina Andrews 1/3
Hornbeam, Lower wood, Ashwellthorpe, Lucy Denman 2/3
Hornbeam maple leaf 3/3

Hornbeam Carpinus betulus

Although the Hornbeam is abundant in the south and east of England, it is probably the least known common tree. The wood is too hard for general timber uses but is sometimes used to make musical instruments.

Conservation status

Although the hornbeam is not itself, a species of conservation concern, Norfolk's target is to maintain the current extent of lowland mixed deciduous woodland, expanding it where appropriate and encouraging a balance of appropriate management regimes. The cessation of traditional management practices such as coppicing has lead to a reduction in structural diversity within many types of woodland. Modern agricultural practices have led to the simplification of landscapes through the removal of hedgerows and intense cultivation up to woodland boundaries, ecologically isolating them.

Details

Did you know?

The name hornbeam comes from its tough wood, ‘horn’ meaning hard and ‘beam’ meaning a tree in old English. As the hornbeam is such a tough wood it is used for making butchers' blocks, mallets, balls, and skittles. Before steel became cheap it was used to make spokes and cogwheels.

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