Agrimony by Paul Lane 1/2
Agrimony by Philip Precey 2/2

Agrimony Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimony is a member of the rose family although the flowers actually smell weakly of apricots. In the language of flowers agrimony means ‘thankfulness or gratefulness’. It grows in a range of grassy habitats including hedge banks, woodland edges, roadside verges and open grassland. The fruit of agrimony has rough burs which catch in the coats of animals to distribute the seed. A similar but less widespread species called fragrant agrimony also grows in Norfolk; this is a more fragrant and robust plant.

Conservation status

It is widespread across much of Britain except the Highlands, growing where there are basic or neutral soils. The species is declining due to the loss or agricultural improvement of grasslands.

Details

Did you know? Agrimony has been used medicinally since ancient times to heal eyes, but its many other uses include stopping bleeding and the healing of wounds.

In folklore witches often used agrimony in their spells and also to ward off hexes and curses providing protection against goblins and evil spirits.

The flowers are hermaphrodite (having both male and female organs), they are pollinated by bees and flies but if not pollinated by insects the anthers bend towards the stigma and self-pollination occurs.
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