Swift at Hardley by Nick Appleton 1/7
Swift at NWT Cley by Julian Thomas 2/7
Swift at St Benet's Abbey by Roy Smith 3/7
Swift at Hardley by Nick Appleton 4/7
Swift at Happisburgh by Julian Thomas 5/7
Swift at Swafield by Julian Thomas 6/7
Swift at Titchwell by Julian Thomas 7/7

Swift Apus apus

A common summer visitor to Britain which breeds across the UK but most numerously in the South and East. Swifts traditionally nested in crags, sea cliffs and hollow trees but now largely nest in buildings.

Conservation status

Amber listed. Swift numbers have declined by 42% between 1995 and 2003. The current concerns are lack of nest sites due to modernisation of older buildings and lack of suitable nest sites in newer builds, the abundance of their insect food supply and their survival during migration and in their African wintering grounds.

Related questions & advice

Is it true that swifts can sleep when they are flying?

Details

Did you know? Swifts almost never land, they even sleep and mate on the wing and have been found flying as high as 10,000 feet.

Swifts are the fastest bird in level flight with a top recorded speed of 69mph although they slow down to about 25mph to feed.
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