WildWalks - a new way to record wildlife

Get walking and enjoy our wonderful wildlife (photo by Matthew Roberts) 1/3
Enjoy the wonders of nature, while helping it at the same time (photo by Matthew Roberts) 2/3
Records will be used by NWT to study our Living Landscape schemes (photo by Matthew Roberts) 3/3
Our new WildWalks project is a great excuse to get out and take a walk at two of our beautiful nature reserves, while helping wildlife in the Broads National Park at the same time.

Time spent walking in nature makes you feel good. Taking a walk is also an opportunity to help conservation efforts, by keeping a record of what you see on the way and adding your records to those of other visitors to create a fuller picture of the wildlife at the reserve.

It is part of a wider Broads Landscape Partnership project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and run by the Broads Authority. We are focusing on two of our nature reserves in the Broads National Park. Upton Broad and Marshes in the Bure Valley Living Landscape, close to the village of Upton, is an important site for Norfolk hawkers and birds including marsh harriers, barn owls and common cranes. Thorpe Marshes, on the edge of Norwich at Thorpe St Andrew, is home to water voles, otters and orange-tip butterflies. But we are just as interested in your sightings of common wildlife, including plants.

It’s simple to get involved. Visit www.nbis.org.uk/wildwalks and download a free recording card before your visit to Upton Broad or Thorpe Marshes, then log your sightings on the website when you get back home. Whether it’s a single sighting or a longer species list every record counts. They help us build a picture of the wildlife that lives on the reserves and whether species are increasing or decreasing in numbers.

All we need to know are the four W’s –

What you saw (the name of species but please only submit records when you are certain of the identification),
Where you saw it,
When (the date you did your WildWalk)
Who saw it (your email contact details so that if the record is unusual further details can be taken).

Wildlife of course changes with the seasons, which is why it is valuable for us to find some volunteers willing to take the same WildWalk route at least four times a year. But even if you only visit once we would love you to log your records and help wildlife conservation in Norfolk.
Free training at recording workshops
Register your interest by emailing us now
Wild Volunteers
Volunteering opportunities at Thorpe Marshes, taking place once a month on a Friday
Teachers and local schools
There will be the opportunity for a free visit to your school to help your pupils learn about loc...