Take part in our survey today – Be ‘eagle’ eyed this winter

Winter is often a very good time of year to spot birds of prey. As the trees have lost their leaves the silhouettes of these birds, as they perch in search of prey, can often be quite obvious. During December, January and February we are asking people to help us record three birds of prey that you might find locally roosting or hunting along a roadside verge. So this winter please listen out for and keep your eyes peeled for:
 
• Little owls
• Kestrels
• Tawny owls
 
You don’t have to be an expert to make a valuable contribution to local knowledge of Norfolk’s wildlife. Recording wildlife is an easy way to get involved in wildlife conservation; it is a way of helping us to monitor wildlife within the county, helping us to gain an understanding of an animal’s or plant’s distribution. Every wildlife record counts and will be of value to us. Your sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife in your local area and help us identify species in decline or under threat.
 
So this winter why not help Norfolk’s wildlife by telling us where and when you see little owls, kestrels and tawny owls?

Our current total of wildlife records submitted for this survey are


429
Kestrel

30
Little Owl

58
Tawny Owl

Log your wildlife sightings here...

Sighting locations so far...


Key

Kestrel
Little Owl
Tawny Owl

Take Part in Our Survey Today - Put Birds of Prey on the Map

During December, January and February we are asking people to help us record three birds of prey that you may see hunting along roadsides or roosting in an old tree or building. Listen out for the ‘too-wit too-woo’ of a tawny owl; watch out for the hovering flight of a kestrel on the hunt, and investigate (from a distance) mature trees for a watchful little owl. Your wildlife sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife in your local area. To find out more about why we are gathering sightings see below. Every wildlife records counts, take part today!

Find out more about our survey species below
Kestrel
Kestrels are the birds you see hovering over the verges at the side of the road looking for prey....
Little Owl
if you see a small grumpy looking owl sitting on a post or tree you will be seeing a little owl. ...
Tawny Owl
The tawny owl with its distinctive toowit twoo call can be found throughout Norfolk. At dusk look...
Your records will help us build a picture of the distribution of these species, helping us to find if there any existing strong holds for these species in Norfolk.

Kestrels

  1. Its Latin name is Falco tinnunculus. Falco comes from falcis meaning sickle because of the falcons hooked talons and kestrel is derived from the French word crechelle meaning ratchet.
  2. Kestrels don’t build their own nests, they will use holes in buildings, trees, walls, cliffs or they will use old crows nests. They also take readily to nestboxes.
  3. Unusually for raptors there is no aggression between the chicks and they will roost together for some time after fledging.
  4. Kestrels can see a beetle at 50m.
  5. Kestrels are sensitive to ultraviolet light and this allows them to see the urine scent trails left by voles, one of their main prey items.

Little owls

  1. Latin name Athene noctua. The name Athene comes from Pallas Athene the Greek goddess of wisdom and arts and Noctua is an owl sacred to the goddess Minerva.
  2. Little owls feed on earthworms. If a large worm suddenly pops out, whilst being pulled by a little owl, it can cause the owl to fall over backwards.
  3. The little owl appeared on the 100 guilder banknote in 1992 in the Netherlands.
  4. Little owls like dark nest holes and if they can’t find a suitable hole in a tree they will nest in a rabbit hole.
  5. The call of the little owl was thought to have heralded the murder of Julius Caesar.

Tawny owls

  1. The female owl calls too-wit and the male calls too-woo.
  2. Tawny owls’ ears are placed asymmetrically to enable them to locate their prey better by sound.
  3. Young owlets leave the nest before they are fully fledged, although they do not go too far from the nest and the adults will attack intruders that come too near their young.
  4. Tawny owls don’t need to drink as they can get sufficient liquids from their prey.
  5. Tawny owls will take smaller owls as prey.

Download the reports on our previous surveys

   Brown-hare,-barn-owl-and-common-frog-survey-April,-May-and-June-2015 Download   
   Hedgehog,-House-Martin-and-Red-Admiral-Survey-August-2015 Download   
   Water-vole,-grass-snake-and-Himalayan-balsam-survey-July-2015 Download   
Show more +
Have you seen any other wildlife recently? We would love to hear about it... Notify us now

How to take part in this wildlife survey...

Online


The quickest way to take part is by clicking on the submit button below. You will then be asked: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By phone


Phone Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s Wildlife Information Service on 01603 598333. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By e-mail


Send us an email to wild@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

Take part today...