Take Part in Our Survey Today - Put Norfolk's Wildlife on the Map

Take part in our survey today - Put your autumn wildlife on the map

Nature’s larder is at its best during the autumn, with hedgerows bursting with fruits, nuts and of course the animals feeding on the feast. During September, October and November we are asking people to help us record three animals you may see feasting on a hedgerow near
you.

• Bullfinch
• Fieldfare
• Peacock butterfly

You don’t have to be an expert to make a valuable contribution to local knowledge of Norfolk’s wildlife. Recording wildlife is an easy way to get involved in wildlife conservation; it is a way of helping us to monitor wildlife within the county, helping us to gain an understanding of an animal’s or plant’s distribution. Every wildlife record counts and will be of value to us. Your sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife in your local area and help us identify species in decline or under threat.

So this autumn why not help Norfolk’s wildlife by telling us where and when you see bullfinches, fieldfares and peacock butterflies?

Our current total of wildlife records submitted for this survey are


4
Fieldfare

32
Peacock butterfly

26
Bullfinch

Log your wildlife sightings here...

Sighting locations so far...


Key

Bullfinch
Fieldfare
Peacock butterfly

Take Part in Our Survey Today - Put Your Autumn Wildlife on the Map

During September, October and November we are asking people to help us record three animals that are regularly found feeding on hedgerows. So this Autumn listen out for the ‘creaking gate’ contact call of the bullfinch, scan the hedgerow for a basking peacock butterfly and keep your eyes peeled for a winter visiting fieldfare.. Your wildlife sightings can help us identify areas which are especially important for wildlife in your local area. To find out more about why we are gathering sightings see below. Every wildlife records counts, take part today!

Find out more about our survey species:
•    Bullfinch - https://www.norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk/wildlife-in-norfolk/species-explorer/birds/bullfinch
•    Fieldfare -
•    Peacock butterfly
Bullfinch
With distinctive red underparts and black cap, the colourful bullfinch can be seen in parks, g...
Fieldfare
Fieldfares are large stocky thrushes with a similar shape to blackbirds and the same size as a mi...
Peacock butterfly
Peacocks are large butterflies with a wingspan of 63-75 mm with the males larger than the females...
Your records will help us build a picture of the distribution of these species in Norfolk and demonstrate the important role hedgerorws play in providing food and a safe refuge for Norfolk’s Wildlife.

Bullfinch

  • Bullfinches stay in their pairs all year round and do not move than a few kilometres from their home area.
  •  In the past bullfinches were shot and trapped because they were seen as a threat to commercial orchards as they feed on developing buds. Happily this is not now the case and the birds are left alone.
  • Bullfinches are not found in in the fens and grazing marshes of east Norfolk during the summer months.
  • The oldest ringed bullfinch found was 9 years and 2 months old.
  • At one time bullfinches were trapped and kept as cage birds because they were easy to tame and good mimics.

Fieldfare

  • Although some fieldfares stay in Norfolk over the summer months there is no record of them breeding in Norfolk. They are mainly a migrant and overwintering species.
  • Fieldfares are social birds and are often seen in flocks of up to 200 hundred birds.
  • The Spanish call fieldfares the Royal Thrush because of their upright stature and beautiful plumage.
  • The fieldfare’s Latin name is Turdus pilaris which translates as thrush hair. This is because the Greek for thrush - trikhas was mistranslated as trikhos meaning hair when the Latin name was established.
  • Fieldfares are normally shy birds but in hard winters when food is in short supply they will come into gardens looking for food especially berries.

Peacock butterfly

  • Peacock butterflies overwinter as an adult. This means you may see them flying on warm winter days.
  • The ‘eyes’ on their wings give them their common name but the underside of a peacock butterfly’s wings looks like a dead leaf.
  • The peacock lays its eggs on stinging nettles and these are the food plant of the caterpillars when they hatch out.
  • The newly hatched caterpillars spin a communal web and they stay in this to feed until they are big enough to forage on their own.
  • The peacock butterfly if a strong flyer and ranges widely to find its preferred habitat of in the shelter of woodland edges, clearings and rides.

Download the reports on our previous surveys

   Brown-hare,-barn-owl-and-common-frog-survey-April,-May-and-June-2015 Download   
   Hedgehog,-House-Martin-and-Red-Admiral-Survey-August-2015 Download   
   Water-vole,-grass-snake-and-Himalayan-balsam-survey-July-2015 Download   
Show more +
Have you seen any other wildlife recently? We would love to hear about it... Notify us now

How to take part in this wildlife survey...

Online


The quickest way to take part is by clicking on the submit button below. You will then be asked: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By phone


Phone Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s Wildlife Information Service on 01603 598333. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

By e-mail


Send us an email to wild@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk. Don’t forget you will need to tell us: what you saw, when you saw it, where you saw it and who you are.

Take part today...