White willow, David North 1/1

White Willow and Crack Willow Salix alba and Salix fragilis

White willow grows in wet areas, its stems used to construct decorative baskets. A variety of the white willow is used to make cricket bats.

Conservation status

Widely distributed and not thought to be under threat in Norfolk. In parts of the country willow numbers have declined. This may be due to a number of factors such as: house and road developments, cutting down trees, or lack of management of stands of willow which were once managed for their timber but are now left to die.

Details

Did you know?

In Britain there are 14 species of willow tree, and only the oak supports more insect species than a willow. Before planting a willow beside a stream or river you must get permission from the Environment Agency as it could impact the watercourse.

The cricket bat willow (Salix alba 'Caerulea') is a variety of the white willow which arose in Norfolk in the 1870s. It is now widely planted sometimes in large plantations, and its timber is used in the making of cricket bats.
 

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