Slipper limpet stack by Paul Naylor 1/2
Slipper limpets by Rob Spray 2/2

Slipper Limpet Crepidula fornicata

The conical shape of the common limpet is an unmistakable characteristic of this sea creature.

Conservation status

There are no conservation issues regarding this marine species.

Details

Did you know?

In order to prevent desiccation at low tide limpets grind a groove into the rock surface on which they live. This makes a mould of the shell edge in which the shell then sits. At high tide the limpet moves off to feed on algae returning back to its ‘home site’ by following a mucus trail. When the tide is out the limpet is back sitting in its groove, giving itself extra protection from the open air. This is a fascinating piece of behaviour and open to further research as to the underlying mechanisms involved. Researchers could manipulate distances from the home site and disrupt routes of mucus to learn more about the possible memory mechanisms involved.

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