Take action: Cley to Salthouse

Cley Marshes, photo by Barry Madden 1/3
Hedgehog by Dave Kilbey 2/3
Volunteering by Tony McKie 3/3
During the twentieth century, with the advent of industrial farming, the invention of chemical fertilisers and pesticides, the draining of ponds and wet meadows, the loss of hedges and the commercial improvement of many rough grasslands, the countryside became much more hostile to our wildlife and many species suffered greatly. All too many species are now rare, restricted to small patches of habitat on isolated nature reserves. Bitterns and marsh harriers have recovered somewhat but are largely confined to reedbeds and fens protected by conservationists. In living memory red-backed shrikes, stone curlews and corn buntings have disappeared as breeding birds from the Cley to Salthouse Living Landscape. Otters and water voles were both pushed to the verge of local extinction too. And on the inland heaths nightingale numbers have dwindled and tree pipits have all but ceased to breed.

The Wildlife Trusts’ vision of a Living Landscape aims to turn back the clock, restoring not just wildlife-rich habitat to landscapes across the country but also restoring wildlife and wild habitats to people’s daily lives. At Norfolk Wildlife Trust we firmly believe that both people and wildlife benefit from such interaction; in fact we believe it is the key ingredient in reversing the degradation of our countryside. We believe in a future Norfolk landscape in which a thriving natural environment helps local people live healthier, richer lives, and where children grow up feeling part of the fascinating, beautiful natural world around them.

Is this an impossible vision of the future? We don’t think so. There are many ways we can all contribute to making it happen. Follow the links below to see how you can make a difference, for nature and for your own wellbeing and health.
Wildlife advice
Have a question about Norfolk’s nature? Try looking through the factsheets we have compiled to he...
Surveys
A vital first step in safeguarding local wildlife is to find out what species are in the area.
Wildlife champions
Coming soon. Watch this space.

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